Monday, June 26, 2006

Comics Out 28 June 2006

Nothing caught my eye this week, but let us know if you saw or are expecting anything. And I liked the comics free-for-all we had last time, so anything to discuss this week (comic books or comic book news), discuss. Midtown comics online is the place to check every Saturday for what is coming out in a given week (As opposed to Previews which only tells you when something is supposed to come out). The Midtown comics site will be added to the blog links soon.

Update: since Superman Returns came out this week, this is where we are talking about it (and avoiding spoilers that wouldn't be in a movie review).

17 comments:

Ping33 said...

Runaways #17!!!!
Runaways is the best meat & potatoes monthly superhero book out there. That and Exterminators are the two monthlys I look forward to most these days.

Also last issues of the OYL Superman and Batman series... but yeah looks like a short week overall.

The Futurist said...

geoff: this is what's great about 52. It's there for you when you need it - like a big oafish friend that loves to talk but has little to say.

ping: have they collected Runaways into a trade yet?

Ping33 said...

They are doing Runaways in digest, and have a Oversized Hardcover of the entire 1st series.

It's a really great book. I love it, my wife loves it, everyone I've strong armed into reading it at least says they love it.

The Futurist said...

I saw Superman last night. I really want to give my opinion, but I'm going to wait until next week's 'comics out' blog. I'm ready to pop, though.

Geoff Klock said...

Actually the movie is out this week, and that's comics news, and there are reviews out, so I say go for it -- how was Superman Returns (try to avoid large spoilers though)?

Ping33 said...

Yeah esp since us people living in the UK are getting hosed.
On the plus side, the 3-d Imax one opens the same day as the normal one here.

The Futurist said...

Structurely flawed. It had HUGE pacing and tension problems. Almost every scene was too long and I wasn't sure when one event was supposed to be more important then another. The acting was lazy and every scene felt staged. Rewatch Richard Donner's original and you'll see how organic the acting is and how each scene is unique, resonating with a kind of real world chaos. The casting wasn't the problem here, it was the level of artiface. Singer is a style guy, so everything is constructed to be perfect. But it all flat lines very quickly. In Donner's original, peaceful middle America is contasted severely by the chaotic big city. In Singer's version Smallville and Metropolis feel like the same, dull place.

Geoff Klock said...

I have not seen the movie, but for those who don't know him, The Futurist is never wrong about stuff like this.

Mitch said...

I'm going tonight...

Having seen the future, can The Futurist ever be wrong?

The Futurist said...

I have seen the future, and you're all very rich and happy with long, shiney cars, and olympic size swimming pools

mitch said...

Okay...

So, I agree with you for the most part, Futurist. The thing that stuck me the most was the amount that Singer borrowed from his own X-Films. Did you notice this too? I don't want to spoil anything, but the Superman/Lois/Richard White dynamic is VERY familiar. Especially with "Cyclops" playing Richard White. There is also a moment that connects Luthor to Magneto.

The Futurist said...

Mitch: I've been thinking about how brooding and miserable it all was. It's really similar to the way DC played catch up with Marvel in the silver age - by trying to give their fantastic, trouble-free characters some real world conflict. In X-Men the conflict is inherent, In Superman it has to be constructed. The narrative similarity you pointed out is a perfect example of this.

Geoff Klock said...

I finally got around to seeing Superman Returns. The Futurist, as always, is dead on. I thought it was charming in places – Olson was great, Luthor in his bathrobe was fun, and even Routh made me smile at times. But with Brando, the original theme tune, the evil real estate, the very un-magical city, and the bimbo sidekick, the whole thing felt like a rerun or revival rather than a remake or a re-imagining. It is a study of the nostalgias, and not a genuine engagement with a character that – and I admit this is very very hard – should be made to really matter. I didn’t get anything from the film I couldn’t get from the earlier ones. It was possibly the most unnecessary film since the shot-for-shot Psycho remake.

And a minor point: the name is “Luthor” not “Luther.” I was very impressed in an episode of the fourth season of Angel, when a character (Gwen) clearly enunciated the name. It’s the kind of geekery you can always count on Joss Whedon for. Luthor. Luthor. Say it with me. Luthor.

Mitch: what's the Magneto-Luthor link?

mitch said...

It's very, very small Geoff and perhaps I'm imagining it. There's the moment when Parker Posey says something like:

"Are billions of people really gonna die, Lex?"

There is this pause, as Luthor sort of considers this and tries to reconcile himself with it. Then he says, "Yes" without any doubt or regret.

Almost, Spacey.. Almost. Here's how it' actually done:

Magneto has Rogue in chains as they approach the Statue of Liberty in the boat. Rogue catches a glimpse of the ship captain that Mystique has killed. She asks, "Are you gonna kill me?"

Again, a moment passes, where Magneto truely puts the situation into perspective for himself. He simply says, "Yes".

I don't know. Am I crazy? It struck me as trying to establish Lex as the kind as a Magneto-syled badass at the last minute.

Geoff Klock said...

I don't think you are crazy Mitch: the fact that Singer was in charge of both projects makes it a solid link.

I wanted to add one more thought on Superman Returns -- now that I have read All Star Superman, I can't see Superman any other way. He should be relaxed all the time, and cool, not angsty and trying to hold it together. Morrison's version is very persuasive and I think he is going to own Superman for some time.

Mitch (He's a Ghostbuster) said...

The perfect, all-encompassing critique of Superman Returns occurred to me today, in tee-shirt form.

I work in Times Square. As you can imagine, I see a lot of tee-shirts. Thousands.

One day, before I even saw the movie, I passed a guy wearing a Superman Returns tee-shirt. The shirt matched Brandon Routh's costume: Muted colors, a smaller "S". Here's the thing, this shirt was "distressed" to look like it was fifteen years old. In fact, it's in the same state as my own "I'm a Ghostbuster!" tee-shirt. The "S" symbol was faded and coming apart, as if this were some great childhood treasure of his... kept, maintained and worn occasionally to illicit comments like, "Man, I can't believe you've still got that!"

But the truth of the matter is he probably paid $30 for an already-ratty tee-shirt.

Geoff Klock said...

Mitch -- manufactured nostalgia. Brilliant. You are right: the film in a nutshell. We all paid ten dollars to see a movie that feels like it was made in 1980.